Glossary

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Atwood Sawyer

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 11 Jan 2014 02:19

Founded in England in 1956 by Horace Atwood (Sawyer was a silent partner), Atwood & Sawyer produced copies of 18th- and 19th-century precious jewelry, many pieces for the Dallas and Dynasty TV series, and glittering diamante compositions for the Miss World competitions. In recent years, however, it is their exquisite Christmas jewelry that has really proved popular with collectors.

Aurora Borealis

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 10 Jan 2014 23:31

Swarovski developed this polychrome metal surface coating for rhinestones in 1956 and called it "Aurora Borealis". The technique was named after the color-shifting phenomenon Northern Lights often seen in high altitude regions in the northern hemisphere. They have an iridescent fantasy finish.

Avon

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 11 Jan 2014 02:23

The American company Avon was founded in 1886 as the California Perfume Company. In the late 1920s it introduced the Avon line of jewelry and subsequently changed its name to Avon Products Inc. Avon was a door-to-door company that made a fortune with a direct personal sales pitch to the lady of the house. Avon has been very successful at introducing reasonably priced, good-quality jewelry to American homemakers through their catalogs.

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Cha Cha Bracelet

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 05 Mar 2014 17:34

A cha-cha bracelet looks like a watchband, but with little loops on each section for attaching beaded head pins.

Confetti Lucite

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 07 Feb 2014 21:01

Confetti lucite jewelry brought acrylics back as a fashion fad in the 1950s and '60s, the plastic pillows embedded with everything from shells to metallic shreds.

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Dead Stone

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 04 Apr 2014 19:00

A term reserved for foil-back rhinestones that have blackened, yellowed or dulled.

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Festoon

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 04 Apr 2014 19:03

This term is reserved for long necklaces that drape or hang in a loop low on the chest.

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J Hook

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 27 Feb 2014 18:01

The catch used to secure a necklace off a rhinestone or beaded chain, also referred to as a shepherd's hook.

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La Pierre

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 11 Mar 2014 20:42

The La Pierre Manufacturing Company was founded in 1885 in New York City, but relocated its factory to Newark in 1893. Until 1929, in addition to silverware it produced good-quality jewelry, notably bangles, belt buckles, and pins, also in silver but sometimes made with "novelty" materials such as celluloid.

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Pop It Beads

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 07 Feb 2014 21:04

A "let's get casual" approach to prim and proper pearls. In the 1950's-'60s they came in bright colors and were so cheap they could be layered in non-stop strands of any length.

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Sweater Clip

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 07 Feb 2014 21:13

Sweater clips connected two identical or related figurals (kind and queen, spider and web, gladiator and chariot, comedy and tragedy masks). From Betty Anderson to Mary Stone, draping a sweater over shoulders and clipping on the pins was the ultimate fashion for 1950s-60's TV style icons. The chatelaine or clip, when connected to both sides of a collar, prevented sweaters from slipping off - not to mention adding clever jewelry accents to outfits.

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Wiki

by RibbonsEdgeRibbonsEdge 28 Nov 2013 20:00

According to Wikipedia, the world largest wiki site:

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